Spring 2010 Gleason Lake E-News

From Your Associaton President, Donna Wolsted

APRIL - Our spring updates on the website are done: gleasonlake.org  
Please check it and send us comments and  your email address (if we do not have it). We would like to communicate lake updates during the summer. Emails cut costs - saving on printing, stationery and stamps - so we can use our money for lake projects.

MAY - We are starting the 4th year MCWD/DNR herbicide (Aquathol K) study to control curly leaf pondweed. The good news is we are gaining on CLP, an invasive plant. We have a total 160 acres of water and wetlands. In 2007, we sprayed 145 acres and in 2009, 85 acres. We sprayed roughly 30 acres at a cost of $9,400 on April 22, 2010. Thank you for supporting this program with your signatures and donations.    

May 13th - Oakwood School Environmental Fair, 5:30-8pm   All welcome.      

JUNE 12th - 9:30 - 11am Please join us at Waycliffe Docks for continental breakfast near the Gleason Lake Dam (area will be posted).  Watch for separate email details.        

June 30th - Music in Plymouth -  Hilde Center. Environmental educational games.

Stormwater Holding Ponds

South of C.R.6 and North of Gleason have been amended;  Pond 7 was doubled in size and improved (behind Gleason North Townhomes). We hope to see improvement in our water quality in the coming years.  Next the City and Watershed will be working north of C.R. 6.     

Donations  

"Thank you" everyone who donated to the Oct-Dec '09 Fundraising. Over 80% of the 2009 donations went directly to lake quality projects.   Look for more  accounting details in September newsletter.  

Boating

There is a "NO WAKE AREA" south of Luce LIne bridge until past the peninsula. The lakeshore owners appreciate your thoughtfulness.

North End Channel Makers:

It is important to get out early and often to create a pathway to the south. Coontail dominates the north bay; it is a native plant that filters nutrients out of the water. It is a floating plant and therefore constant usage will help keep paths open and the plants from matting thick.